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Why you should raise your prices more often

 
Craig Toyne, Accountant and Business Adviser at Rethink Financial Group

I recently had a café owner come to me upset that that his business was not making a profit. Now, 3 years ago I had met the same business owner when the cafe had been trading  well and making a nice profit ($150,000 profit on sales of $1.5m – a return of 10% on turnover)

Over a coffee, we discussed his business in a bit more detail. The café was busy, there was the usual staff turnover, but of most interest was that the profit margin had been reducing. It appeared that both staff costs and food costs had been increasing faster than the turnover had been. The business owner had put this down to increased award wage rates and problems in the kitchen.

We  talked for a bit longer, And I happened to ask when was the last time he had increased his prices. His reply “oh not for a while, maybe 3 or 4 years ago. It is pretty competitive in my industry, so I can’t really increase them”.

And there it was! With inflation running at 2.5 – 3%, over that 3 – 4 year period his costs had increased by around 10% and wiped out his profit. Now he is in the position that he has to have a big price increase and as we all know, that is a problem.

This situation could have been avoided if the café owner had made small annual increases to his prices. Customers would have had an expectation that this would happen and therefore any resistance would have been minimal.

However, like my friend with the café,  many business owners believe they cannot increase their prices. If this is the case, you need to be innovative and find a way to increase the value you give your customer and offer that at the same time you raise your price. Better still if  you can provide this value at little cost, then you have a great solution.

For example, a café could offer a wider range of coffee flavours or a slightly larger cup size at the time of increasing their price. Alternatively, a new menu offers the opportunity to reduce food costs or increase prices by offering something not directly comparable to what was offered on the previous menu. This type of strategy would have certainly helped the café owner.

So when did you last raise your prices?

If you have any questions in relation to the information in this article or would like to come in and have a chat to us to get some support, we’d only be too happy. Simply submit an enquiry below or phone our office 02 4962 4440.

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